More white rice, more diabetes risk

Over 20 million people in the United States (about 8% of the population) have type 2 diabetes.Carrying excess fat and eating high glycemic load (GL) foods contribute to the development of insulin resistance, leading to type 2 diabetes. In spite of considerable more overweight and obesity in the USA, and our dangerous diet, there is considerable more diabetes in China, Korea and Japan. This is mostly because of white rice – refined carbohydrates like white rice, devoid of fiber to slow down absorption of sugars, raise blood glucose more and faster (have a higher glycemic load, or GL) than their intact, unprocessed counterparts. A new meta-analysis of four studies has explored the link between white rice and diabetes – overall, the researchers found that each daily serving of white rice increased the risk of diabetes by 11%.2 This new research serves to remind us: High-glycemic, nutrient-depleted, refined carbohydrates (like white rice) are more than just empty calories – they are disease-causing foods. Read more….

Not just diabetes – cancer too
High GL foods have dangers that reach beyond diabetes. Diets including large quantities of high GL foods increase the risk of several chronic diseases including diabetes, heart disease, and cancers.3 Low-nutrient, high glycemic foods could also contribute significantly to cancer by causing excessive insulin secretion. High insulin levels in the blood can promote the growth of cancer cells, in part by interacting with the receptor for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1).4 Diabetics are far more likely to develop several cancers than non-diabetics. This increased risk of cancer observed in diabetics is thought to be due in part to cancer-promo ting effects of insulin therapy.5,6

In the past, white rice was looked upon as a healthful, low fat staple in a vegetarian diet. We have progressed in nutritional knowledge such that white rice can no longer be considered healthful, or even neutral – it is a disease-causing food. The damaging effects of high-GL foods have been brought to light, and we now know that the most healthful carbohydrate sources are those with lower GL – beans, peas, intact whole grains, and starchy vegetables.

This is an article by Dr Joel Fuhrman. Read more and comment at DiseaseProof.com

 

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